How to write a political speech


How to write a political speech by making the following assumptions about who is going to be elected to office (that are probably false; and, of course, not to be taken seriously): • The candidate who will represent their constituents • The candidate who has the most credibility • The candidate with the highest standing • The candidate with the highest numbers of votes • The candidate with the highest support • The candidate with the highest votes • The candidate with the highest support from non-white voters • The candidate with the most support from women • The candidate with the least amount of support from all income groups • The candidate whose support is dependent upon the number of votes earned • The candidate whose support is dependent upon the percentage of total support earned • Each of those three assumptions has its place in this analysis.

If we make them one, then, we can understand the significance of the assumption. If, in fact, the candidate with the most support from all income groups is more likely to win, then we can make the assumption that the candidate with the worst support from all income groups should do better in every election.Now let’s get to our problem. What is the extent to which the electoral college is composed of racial, ethnic, and religious divisions? And if racial and ethnic divisions are not a barrier to elections, how often are white, working-class voters less likely to vote (because no one will want to) as well (because of their poverty)?So one of the major purposes of this analysis is to ask the following questions:Does the electoral college have enough racial, ethnic, or religious divisions, but does it have enough minority, white, and middle-class voters?

Why does the electoral college have such a large number of minority voters when the rest of the population is predominantly white? Is it because minority voters are the most likely to vote in all-white districts if such voting is widespread?For those of you with a bit of time, let’s just start reading the text.First, I recommend that you consult a book that can give you an in-depth breakdown of the electoral college: The History of the Electoral College . This book is particularly insightful in trying to draw some solid conclusions about who should become president if it comes to choosing someone to the White House.Next, I recommend that you read The Making of a Great State, with its examination of the electoral system.

This is more accessible and gives more insight into what the differences were between the Democrats and Republicans back in the 1760s.Finally, I recommend that

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